SHORTS UNDER 10

Featured Animation: HATE FOR SALE

Every so often I come across a short film that I will silently pass on to my fellow film loving friends. Key word: silently. I don’t need to try to sale the film or wax poetic about this or that, over using filmic language with my signature heavy-handed verbosity. No, sometimes I come across a true gem that doesn’t require my word vomit explanations. It takes just a simple: “Watch this. Trust me.”  This is exactly what I did after watching Anna Eijsbouts’ stop-motion cut out animation “Hate for Sale”. Created for the 2017 Visible Poetry Project using an original poem by Neil Gaiman, this short manages to sum up the world we live in, in just under 3 minutes. Eijsbouts’ chaotic, multi-colored style mixed with Gaiman’s honest text creates sheer, gorgeous magic. It’s cruel, unique, and brutally true. It’s beautiful and arresting. The harsh words about the state of society and our sadly inherent lust for hatefulness in contrast with narrator Peter Kenny’s theatrical yet comforting voice and the film's visual puppet master controlled carnival-esque world is pretty much perfect in a way you have to watch to totally grasp. Just a few days before discovering this film, I spent a morning at a puppet theater. It was like disappearing into a totally different world, full of strings and illusions. Like the 20+ other 3-year-old audience members, I was entranced, fooled even. Now, after a few viewings of “Hate for Sale”, I feel like I finally get it. I see the control that societal expectations have over us. It took a 2.5 min short and a Park Slope puppet theater to truly open my eyes. We all need to cut some strings.  So, yes, it seems I’ve run away again with my words! Neil Gaiman himself tweeted that he watched and “was floored”. And that’s enough for me. Just: Watch this. Trust me.  

Marilyn Myller; another spectacular short film from Mikey Please

The film is an ironic tale of creation, with the appropriate tagline: "Marilyn maketh, Marilyn taketh awayth" Mikey Please, director of one of IndieStreet's favorite animated shorts "Eagleman's Stag", has come up with another brilliant piece here. It is a funny thing with life and artistic creation...sometimes others will give appreciation to creative works when the artist least expects it, and typically the appreciation is not for what we intended as artists at all. Is creation stupid, or are the ones who perceive it stupid? Street Creds to Mikey Please and the whole staff at Parabella Studio; keep your wonderful craft and unique style of story telling alive!

"Dust", an awesomely cool depiction of a timeless tale.

We thought this film was one of the most innovative short films we have seen all year. Written and directed by Ben Ockrent & Jake Russell, the film has no dialogue, but that is one of the things that make the storytelling so impressive. It is a beautifully executed, tight journey that the directors bring us on, and the acting by two wonderful actors, specifically Alan Rickman, make this a short film that is surely one from the cream of this years crop.

Bacardi Untameable: A short doc from Sean Dunne

Check out this short doc commercial from our partner filmmakers Sean Dunne and Cass Greener.  Street Creds to Bacardi for making storytelling paramount, and picking a spectacular documentary director to get the job done.

Short Film: Living Like Kings

The Christchurch Earthquake left the majority of its population devastated, but for a small group of homeless people, disaster brought about new and luxurious living opportunities - a taste of what it’s like to live like a king.

Director, Zoe McIntosh gives us a brief, but intriguing look at the fragility of wealth, the staying power of natural disaster, and the old saying "one man's trash is another mans treasure."  The film is a part of 10, 3-minute documentaries from New Zealand titled Loading Docs.  Check them all out, they are all only 3 minutes, and all innovative in their own right!  Street Creds to New Zealand filmmakers!

This charming short had a budget of < $100 USD

"Russian Roulette" was created by Ben Aston while in pre-production on another film.  Even a short film with a cosmic element doesn't have to break the bank if the script is well thought out. Ben calls it a “nice parallel between emptiness of space and the loneliness one can experience when completely surrounded.” Loneliness is feeling that at times can be accentuated by a crowd. Check out Ben's directing website.