SHORTS UNDER 10

Featured Animation: HATE FOR SALE

Every so often I come across a short film that I will silently pass on to my fellow film loving friends. Key word: silently. I don’t need to try to sale the film or wax poetic about this or that, over using filmic language with my signature heavy-handed verbosity. No, sometimes I come across a true gem that doesn’t require my word vomit explanations. It takes just a simple: “Watch this. Trust me.”  This is exactly what I did after watching Anna Eijsbouts’ stop-motion cut out animation “Hate for Sale”. Created for the 2017 Visible Poetry Project using an original poem by Neil Gaiman, this short manages to sum up the world we live in, in just under 3 minutes. Eijsbouts’ chaotic, multi-colored style mixed with Gaiman’s honest text creates sheer, gorgeous magic. It’s cruel, unique, and brutally true. It’s beautiful and arresting. The harsh words about the state of society and our sadly inherent lust for hatefulness in contrast with narrator Peter Kenny’s theatrical yet comforting voice and the film's visual puppet master controlled carnival-esque world is pretty much perfect in a way you have to watch to totally grasp. Just a few days before discovering this film, I spent a morning at a puppet theater. It was like disappearing into a totally different world, full of strings and illusions. Like the 20+ other 3-year-old audience members, I was entranced, fooled even. Now, after a few viewings of “Hate for Sale”, I feel like I finally get it. I see the control that societal expectations have over us. It took a 2.5 min short and a Park Slope puppet theater to truly open my eyes. We all need to cut some strings.  So, yes, it seems I’ve run away again with my words! Neil Gaiman himself tweeted that he watched and “was floored”. And that’s enough for me. Just: Watch this. Trust me.  

Q: Why are billions wasted each year on legal counsel?

Answer: This short film, "Verbatim: What is a Photocopier" will give a comedic glimpse at the answer. Most of the hard earned dollars are spent paying lawyers to argue, (or have their clients argue) minuscule language interpretations and nonsensical semantic differences. This short film uses the verbatim transcript from a deposition of a Ohio State employee, and it is hilarious. This ridiculous and witty word for word dialogue gives us a glimpse at the sad state of the legal system: Ten minutes of 4 professional peoples lives are wasted on dancing around the definition of a photocopier, and now, thanks to Director Brett Weiner, ten more minutes will be wasted by you laughing at the situation! It's a vicious cycle.

THE EAGLEMAN STAG

IndieStreet Quick Review: "A beautifully told story about the complexities of existence...maybe revealing that humans can only truly comprehend the cyclical beauty of life before the age of 7 and after the age 87. (9/10 Street Cred rating)

'Not Over' a smile inducing short

This little diddy is brought to us by  Toru Hayai (Direction & Animation).  The imagery, story, and accompanying music for this giant stuffed bear are all too grasping not to post.  We are surprised this short has not been adapted into a commercial yet. This one is surely worth its run time of 1:35.

"The Heat": a short film that inspires us to kick ass in

"The Heat" is a short documentary about Heather "The Heat" Hardy, a single mother and professional boxer who was displaced by Hurricane Sandy. Heather uses fighting to provide a living for her and her daughter, Annie, while simultaneously pushing the sport of women's boxing into the mainstream.

Short film: Keith Reynolds can't make it tonight

A coy animated short film about working life & self-reflection from Felix Massie ...The monotonic narrator coupled with the simplistic animated plot twists make the film a true original. Check out more from Felix Massie on his vimeo channel.

One of the Last (Uno degli Ultimi)

This spectacular short film from Paul Zinder was was introduced to IndieStreet by John Columbus, Artistic director of the Black Maria Film Festival.  IndieStreet Quick Review "If more people were like Mauro, and more filmmakers had the character insight to film those people, the world would be a better place. Slightly over ten minutes, but it's an IndieStreet favorite, so stop whining and watch it"