SHORTS UNDER 10

Featured Short: I think this is the closest to how the footage looked

There will always remain traces of the deceased, elements that testify that a life did exist, that deeds were enacted, and struggles engaged in or evaded. Archives are born from a desire to reassemble these traces rather than destroy them.- Achille Mbembe As a medium capable of manipulating and being manipulated, film simultaneously boasts an ability to portray reality while also having a knack for fictionalizing fragments of truth. Archival film/video, a source of falsities and actualities used to materialize past stories and nostalgia, is a good example of the bipolarity of the moving image medium. Things remembered are kept in the light; things forgotten are pushed into darkness. Without light, we have no ability to create or experience film. We have no ability to be enlightened by its complexity.Most archived film/video is conserved, preserved for an unknown future. However, in the insanely affecting and haunting experimental short doc “I think this is the closest to how the footage looked” the footage [in question] recorded of filmmaker Yuval Hameiri and his family on what was to be his final day with his mother, was supposed to be instantly cherished. It was created in order to offer the family the ability to revisit a memory that could never be relived. Or could it? We learn, through the use of inanimate objects, that the final footage was lost in an accident that could never put any person at fault. A badly timed rewinding of a tape - just unfortunate happenstance. Because the footage was lost, Hameiri makes sure that every minute is relived, recreated with random objects, possibly to find some tangible moment or fleeting feeling that has been missing for years. He struggles. We are passive. The audience merely watches a new type of performed archive created for the sake of healing and understanding. We watch silently, comprehending the pain through a multi-layered sense of analog creation. The video tape, the reenactment - all analog, all real. A truly physical sense of trying to put your finger on a life no longer there. It’s hard to describe a film of this type simply because I found it hard to watch. I constantly felt like I was in a place I shouldn’t be. A Peeping Tom. Yes, it’s beautiful and yes, you should absolutely find a quiet, peaceful moment to watch, but be warned: the film is unforgiving in its grief. Truly, Hameiri's film is as real as it gets. Feelings stripped raw. I’ve never experienced anything like it. You’re there and yet you’re far away from it. I’m thankful for this film. For the way it made me feel, cry and understand my own past grief as well as that of the one’s around me. Go, hug your loved ones and reflect: is it better to record every moment and possibly lose it or truly live in the moment and never have the chance to visually relive it again? 

Marilyn Myller; another spectacular short film from Mikey Please

The film is an ironic tale of creation, with the appropriate tagline: "Marilyn maketh, Marilyn taketh awayth" Mikey Please, director of one of IndieStreet's favorite animated shorts "Eagleman's Stag", has come up with another brilliant piece here. It is a funny thing with life and artistic creation...sometimes others will give appreciation to creative works when the artist least expects it, and typically the appreciation is not for what we intended as artists at all. Is creation stupid, or are the ones who perceive it stupid? Street Creds to Mikey Please and the whole staff at Parabella Studio; keep your wonderful craft and unique style of story telling alive!

"Dust", an awesomely cool depiction of a timeless tale.

We thought this film was one of the most innovative short films we have seen all year. Written and directed by Ben Ockrent & Jake Russell, the film has no dialogue, but that is one of the things that make the storytelling so impressive. It is a beautifully executed, tight journey that the directors bring us on, and the acting by two wonderful actors, specifically Alan Rickman, make this a short film that is surely one from the cream of this years crop.

Bacardi Untameable: A short doc from Sean Dunne

Check out this short doc commercial from our partner filmmakers Sean Dunne and Cass Greener.  Street Creds to Bacardi for making storytelling paramount, and picking a spectacular documentary director to get the job done.

Short Film: Living Like Kings

The Christchurch Earthquake left the majority of its population devastated, but for a small group of homeless people, disaster brought about new and luxurious living opportunities - a taste of what it’s like to live like a king.

Director, Zoe McIntosh gives us a brief, but intriguing look at the fragility of wealth, the staying power of natural disaster, and the old saying "one man's trash is another mans treasure."  The film is a part of 10, 3-minute documentaries from New Zealand titled Loading Docs.  Check them all out, they are all only 3 minutes, and all innovative in their own right!  Street Creds to New Zealand filmmakers!

This charming short had a budget of < $100 USD

"Russian Roulette" was created by Ben Aston while in pre-production on another film.  Even a short film with a cosmic element doesn't have to break the bank if the script is well thought out. Ben calls it a “nice parallel between emptiness of space and the loneliness one can experience when completely surrounded.” Loneliness is feeling that at times can be accentuated by a crowd. Check out Ben's directing website.