SHORTS UNDER 10

Featured Short: All Eyes Peeled on "The Procedure"

“A man is kidnapped and forced to endure a strange experiment.”  Kidnapping? Strange experiment? Sound enticing? Well, I’m sitting here staring at my computer screen, thinking about where to begin on this review of “The Procedure”. Sure, there are thousands upon thousands of adjectives in the dictionary. A thesaurus can also come in handy quite often. And yet, I can’t find that one perfect, all-encompassing word to describe filmmaker Calvin Lee Reeder’s…how can I put it?…insane, genius, disgusting, fascinating, peculiar, hilarious, bizarre, curious and well, extremely polarizing, description-defying short film, “The Procedure”. Winner of this year’s Short Film Jury Award for U.S. Fiction at Sundance Film Festival, this oddball little short exists in a filmic world all its own, employing a kinda genreless plot of proportions beyond epic. An official Indie Street Film Festival selection this past summer, a few “butts” may have gotten up from their seats during the screening. Do I blame them? In some cases, no. But did they miss out? Absolutely. Isn’t that the challenge (and half the fun) of challenging your audience? Make them squirm, laugh, feel disgusted - just make them feel something and have them remember that feeling for some time after the credits roll. That’s what the genius of “The Procedure” offers.  ISFF’s own Artistic Director, Jay Webb, described the film as “one of the craziest, funniest, awesomest, sickest, can't stop laughingest films of the year“. If that doesn’t sum it all up, I don’t quite know what will. It’s like that one friend we all have - you can’t take them anywhere but you know, in the end, they will always be the life of the party in their own weird little way. Love to hate, hate to love. We could sit here all day trying to wrap our minds around the on-screen procedure that is featured within “The Procedure”, but you know what? We’ll stop here. Best to go in blindly on this one, guys. Get ready to take your usual film tastes on one heck of a visual adventure. At just under 4 mins long, what could possibly go wrong?! Watch the recent Vimeo Staff Pick Premiere “The Procedure” NOW!  

THE EAGLEMAN STAG

IndieStreet Quick Review: "A beautifully told story about the complexities of existence...maybe revealing that humans can only truly comprehend the cyclical beauty of life before the age of 7 and after the age 87. (9/10 Street Cred rating)

'Not Over' a smile inducing short

This little diddy is brought to us by  Toru Hayai (Direction & Animation).  The imagery, story, and accompanying music for this giant stuffed bear are all too grasping not to post.  We are surprised this short has not been adapted into a commercial yet. This one is surely worth its run time of 1:35.

A Leaked Sex Tape Destroys in the Short Film: Snap!

SNAP! by Kristian Foldager deals with loss of innocence and the danger of exposed secrets. Snap!, features a young woman admitting to her boyfriend that she cheated on him before he can find out through the online grapevine. Naturally, there’s a video. It becomes a living, shared relic of the ruination of their relationship, and the short film shrewdly toys with the question of whether he’ll watch it and how much more damage can be done. “I’m from a small town in Western Zealand, where I attended a hippie school with only 60 pupils far out on the countryside,” says Foldager. “It was a good playground for my creativity – a safe haven from the rest of society that I still feel rather detached to. Today my playground is an office I share with four fellow filmmakers in Central Copenhagen. I’ve been self-employed for eight years – doing shorts, docs, music videos and commercials. “As a child I observed people and situations around me, but was scared of interaction. Today I’m not afraid of interacting, but often struggle with the fascination part. I probably was a better filmmaker as a child. “I wrote this little story around Snapchat, since everyone seems eager to share embarrassing videos with this app. Read on

Having played film festivals worldwide, from Annecy to Edinburgh and Hiroshima to Sundance, Marcel, King of Tervuren has had the kind of festival run you would expect from a filmmaker of Tom Schroeder’s calibre. Blending a flowing animation style with an engaging narrative, Schroeder’s film quickly immerses you into its unexpected world of alcohol, drugs and family feuds. With his camera playfully skittering around the colourful world he has created, Schroeder’s aesthetic playfully places you in the universe of its heroic cockerel. Told mostly through a point-of-view which embeds its audience directly in the farmyard in which Marcel prowls, the animator employs a flurry of bold lines and strong colours to emphasise this hectic period of near-death experiences for our resistant rooster. More Here

Short Film: The Places Where We Lived

Take six minutes to watch this socio-political gem. An animated short about place and space and time and memory and home and South Florida. Premiered at SXSW13 and was the Grand Jury Prize for Animation at AFI Fest 2013.And was the official selection at a host of other festivals across the globe.

Director James Cooper’s Interview with a Time Traveler, as the title would indicate, is indeed a time travel tale. But, unlike the genre tropes that such a lead might presuppose, there are no time jumps and flashy special effects (or nagging plot holes, for that matter). In fact, this film is about as simple a time travel tale that I’ve ever seen—just two guys in a room talking. Read More: http://bit.ly/1spaUeL

This Is It: TWO COLLEGE KIDS. FIRST APARTMENT. SHIT GETS REAL. FAST.

One of the problems many short filmmakers face is working out how much story they should fit into their brief duration. Do they aim to fit the plot of a feature into this bitesize format? Do they use the story as an introduction to a larger universe? Or do they leave plot holes for their viewers to fill in? Demonstrating exactly how it should be done is Alexander Engel’s This Is It – a 3-minute short with ambitions way above its station. Written and Discovered by Shorts of the week: you can you Read More There: http://bit.ly/12YhCSe