SHORTS UNDER 10

Featured Animated Short - ei: emotional intelligence

"As E.I. units, we are doomed to love."  Poignant words from the narrated thoughts of an artificial lifeform. But in "ei: emotional intelligence", filmmaker Dennis Sungmin Kim's first year film at the University of Pennsylvania, we aren't just dealing with the simple concept of artificial intelligence. No, this is about something much deeper than that - going beyond what you would expect from the normal concept of A.I. on film. "ei: emotional intelligence" is a seriously impressive feat that succeeds so beautifully within its uniquely delicate animated style and story. And how does it manage to stand out? By injecting the A.I. concept with something novel yet really, very simple: emotions.  Representing far more than robotic and lifeless technology, this animation follows the story of Arthur and his female companion, two E.I. units - AKA Emotional Intelligence units - that try to live and feel beyond the confines of their created existence. Going a step further than their otherworldly IQ's, mathematical way of thinking, and futuristic, virtual landscapes, their story plays out like a love letter to humankind and where we may be headed. And it does so in such a honest way, with words building a world around the colors and lines of sweet, colorfully stylistic animation. Complementing the impressive gadgetries of A.I. are real emotions - the ones that challenge us, make us weak and eventually give us strength.  Like a rhythmic poem or a finely crafted classical tune, "ei: emotional intelligence" relaxes its viewers through its narration - covering a wide spectrum of thoughts and feelings along the way. We promise you those feelings will keep echoing long after the last frame. With his pulse on great personal design and unique narrative style, Dennis Sungmin Kim's ten month endeavour turned into a first year film that ) he should be extremely proud of and ) you should watch right now!  And while you're at it, why not check out more of the best short films on the web! 

'Not Over' a smile inducing short

This little diddy is brought to us by  Toru Hayai (Direction & Animation).  The imagery, story, and accompanying music for this giant stuffed bear are all too grasping not to post.  We are surprised this short has not been adapted into a commercial yet. This one is surely worth its run time of 1:35.

"The Heat": a short film that inspires us to kick ass in

"The Heat" is a short documentary about Heather "The Heat" Hardy, a single mother and professional boxer who was displaced by Hurricane Sandy. Heather uses fighting to provide a living for her and her daughter, Annie, while simultaneously pushing the sport of women's boxing into the mainstream.

Short film: Keith Reynolds can't make it tonight

A coy animated short film about working life & self-reflection from Felix Massie ...The monotonic narrator coupled with the simplistic animated plot twists make the film a true original. Check out more from Felix Massie on his vimeo channel.

A Leaked Sex Tape Destroys in the Short Film: Snap!

SNAP! by Kristian Foldager deals with loss of innocence and the danger of exposed secrets. Snap!, features a young woman admitting to her boyfriend that she cheated on him before he can find out through the online grapevine. Naturally, there’s a video. It becomes a living, shared relic of the ruination of their relationship, and the short film shrewdly toys with the question of whether he’ll watch it and how much more damage can be done. “I’m from a small town in Western Zealand, where I attended a hippie school with only 60 pupils far out on the countryside,” says Foldager. “It was a good playground for my creativity – a safe haven from the rest of society that I still feel rather detached to. Today my playground is an office I share with four fellow filmmakers in Central Copenhagen. I’ve been self-employed for eight years – doing shorts, docs, music videos and commercials. “As a child I observed people and situations around me, but was scared of interaction. Today I’m not afraid of interacting, but often struggle with the fascination part. I probably was a better filmmaker as a child. “I wrote this little story around Snapchat, since everyone seems eager to share embarrassing videos with this app. Read on

Having played film festivals worldwide, from Annecy to Edinburgh and Hiroshima to Sundance, Marcel, King of Tervuren has had the kind of festival run you would expect from a filmmaker of Tom Schroeder’s calibre. Blending a flowing animation style with an engaging narrative, Schroeder’s film quickly immerses you into its unexpected world of alcohol, drugs and family feuds. With his camera playfully skittering around the colourful world he has created, Schroeder’s aesthetic playfully places you in the universe of its heroic cockerel. Told mostly through a point-of-view which embeds its audience directly in the farmyard in which Marcel prowls, the animator employs a flurry of bold lines and strong colours to emphasise this hectic period of near-death experiences for our resistant rooster. More Here

Short Film: The Places Where We Lived

Take six minutes to watch this socio-political gem. An animated short about place and space and time and memory and home and South Florida. Premiered at SXSW13 and was the Grand Jury Prize for Animation at AFI Fest 2013.And was the official selection at a host of other festivals across the globe.

Director James Cooper’s Interview with a Time Traveler, as the title would indicate, is indeed a time travel tale. But, unlike the genre tropes that such a lead might presuppose, there are no time jumps and flashy special effects (or nagging plot holes, for that matter). In fact, this film is about as simple a time travel tale that I’ve ever seen—just two guys in a room talking. Read More: http://bit.ly/1spaUeL

This Is It: TWO COLLEGE KIDS. FIRST APARTMENT. SHIT GETS REAL. FAST.

One of the problems many short filmmakers face is working out how much story they should fit into their brief duration. Do they aim to fit the plot of a feature into this bitesize format? Do they use the story as an introduction to a larger universe? Or do they leave plot holes for their viewers to fill in? Demonstrating exactly how it should be done is Alexander Engel’s This Is It – a 3-minute short with ambitions way above its station. Written and Discovered by Shorts of the week: you can you Read More There: http://bit.ly/12YhCSe