INDIE FILM REVIEWS

It speaks to the state of cinema that one of the most beautiful, haunting, and powerful films of the year will be seen by most people on a streaming service, but such is case with the growing face of movies these days. The consolation is that movies manage to find a home after their brief festival run even if they are relegated to being content for the digital pipe as opposed to having a shot at being a truly exceptional in-theatre experience.

I’m lucky, then, to have experienced Beasts of No Nation as it was intended, at a glorious, hundred-year-old theatre no less. For Beasts is surely a film to be shared collectively in the dark, one whose power is amplified by the image looming over you while your fellow audience shares in the joys and shocks as the story unfolds.

The tale of a young boy who gets swept up in a civil war and becomes a child soldier, the film proves to be one of the most raw, unforgettable coming-of-age tales ever made. Newcomer Abraham Attah is the film’s core, and his performance is the stuff of legend. His role is both physically and psychologically complex as we the audience simply follow him through his travails.

The film is stunningly shot with some terrific narrative elements, but the direction by Cary Fukunaga may be most lauded for what he draws from young Attah. Kids on film, especially in such a storyline, will make or break the project, and here we see an absolutely riveting turn that provides much of the film’s weight. Fukunaga’s script, based on the novel by Uzodinma Iweala, provides its rich ideas and unsettling moments. Read More

 

 

When a director gets summonsed to court for filming an illegal activity, you know it must be a good documentary (read NY TImes Interview). This film from Lotfy Nathan is centered around "Reckless dirt bike riders that parade through Baltimore’s streets", but "it's important to remember that not every day is a joy ride. 12 O’Clock Boys is also a portrait of a family. Coco is raising Pug and his siblings without their father, in a community that is dangerous for reasons that have nothing to do with bike accidents. - See more at: http://www.filmschoolrejects.com/reviews/12-oclock-boys.php#sthash.rpY2f...

When asked at the QandA after the film premeire "What did you want the audience to leave thinking at the end?" Director Cutter Hodierne replied, "I simply wanted them to leave thinking." Well he succeeded, and since well deserved hype is escalating around this Somali Pirate Vice Films produced feature. Expanding on his SunDance winning 2012 short film on the same subject, Cutter captures the real truths of the complex situation in a manner that will keep you on the edge of your seats. He pulled wonderful performances out of the largely Somali cast, and we at IndieStreet hope that the "Captain Phillips" release will prove to be a help not a hinderance for the exposure of this more honest and stylized representation of the conflicts on the African Coast. Click here to see a teaser for the feature, as well as the entire short film from 2012.

Stanislav Petrov. Few people know of him... Yet hundreds of millions of people are alive because of him. Many independent films aspire to tackle macro-society issues and intimate human relationships within the same story, but it typically results in over-exposition or a muddy story with underdeveloped characters. "The Man Who Saved the World" succeeds in touching the audience with an important societal concern, while also developing the connective tissues to make us feel for a raw, flawed human being. For this, we thank the director, Peter Anthony, and attending producers, Mark Romeo & Christian D. Bruun. With only a few minor areas of over emphasis on story elements (we assume simply to give this well crafted film more widespread impact), this Doc/Drama could not come more highly recommended from Indie Street.

Alice Howland (Julianne Moore) is a beautiful, intelligent, respected, accomplished linguistics professor, but she’s also starting to forget things. Nothing big – a name or where she put something. As an academic with an insatiable desire to learn and teach, plus a bustling family who still look to her for advice and guidance, it’s not surprising that Alice might be a little distracted or overwhelmed from time to time. Read more at Film School Rejects