INDIESTREET

As a confusing, turbulent 2016 comes to an end and we face an uncertain future ahead with the approaching new year, it’s safe to say that things are changing. The world is changing. People are changing. On top of everything, film distribution is changing as well. Award-winning film “Love is All You Need?” is shaking up the self-distribution field a bit and taking heed of both political and cultural current events by doing things a little differently and donating all of their traditional film distribution profits to charities. Based on a viral short film, director and co-writer Kim Rocco Shields has created a $1 million fund for the film to be distributed to 20 nonprofits that partnered with her during the “Love is All You Need?” MovieMent tour. The film toured 20 cities in recognition of the true events depicted in the film - a film that asks us: what would happen if being straight was a sin and sexual "norms" as we know them were flipped? How do we live if we can't love? Once the film reaches 1 million views, the fund will be activated and the proceeds will be disbursed to the nonprofits. This is a timely film with quite the inspiring charitable initiative. Check out Shields' exclusive interview with PR Newswire and read more about the film over at www.loveisallyouneedthemovie.com. Make sure to watch over on iTunes to contribute to the right kind of change we all need in this country!

Indie Street is paving a new road for next generation of self-

With all of the social networking and technology available, we tend to think any consumer who desires to purchase something online should be able to do so easily.  So why is there still a disconnect between independent filmmakers and customers who would love to see their film?  Two answers: (1) lack of cooperation & branding from Independent artists, and (2) a lack of proper curation that is targeted and marketed to Indie film lovers.  IndieStreet.com hopes to provide the connective tissue for Independent cooperation and a community platform that will reach this precise audience.  Our blog provides the best of the creative content on the web, and our films will be an extension of this approach.  Giving our filmmakers and blog curators profit participation in the overall company is a major part of our "All Together Independent" cooperative philosophy.  With this we hope to instill two resounding assurances to our community: 1.  Our customers can be assured that the more they support the IndieStreet brand, the more they are actually supporting the creators behind the content. 2. Our Independent artists can be assured that the more their efforts and creation helps the brand grow, the more they will benefit from being a part of our group distribution company. I will post frequently discussing this exciting potential behind artists adopting a group mentality toward self-distribution. By organizing artists of like minds and and talent into a single branded effort, we hope to start a trend away from large studios and distribution having all of the control in the process of exposing these great works. - Jay Webb, IndieStreet Partner

Are you a freelance creative but in between jobs? Creative Cares is a Non Profit Organization that connects designers, Indie filmmakers, photographers, and artists to Non-profits in their community that can benefit from their craft. Not only will they connect you with something you feel is a worthy cause, you will probably make some connections with amazing individuals who will want to promote your awesome work (and heart) to others they know. You Win, an NPO wins, and society wins.

Will the signature be in yellow??? All jokes aside, Shelley Jackson has a very unique story telling style.  Even if it is a bit hard to follow (read backwards on her Instagram feed), her creativity and dedication is unquestionable. Her first piece was via tattooing  words on skin, this edition is written in snow, we are probably following her to follow her storytelling techniques (what's next?) than we are following her actually stories.

Louie Psihoyos' follow-up to his academy award-winning documentary promises to 'change the way we understand issues of endangered species and mass extinction.' Premiering at this Years Tribeca Film Festival on April 25th, Psihoyos declares that "We’re going to give people happy tears and yet everyone will be on the edge of their seats. I still can’t believe we’re doing what we’re doing. The last four years we’ve been creating a film that I want people to throw down their hard earned money and feel it’s the best money that they ever spent." They were still shooting footage just a week ago, which is really the type of perfectionist passion and disregard for timelines that we should expect from a great documentarian.

"That 2000 Yard Stare" from Tom Lea in 1944 is just one great piece of art produced by American soldiers that can let the American everyday citizen into the complex struggles of wartime that we could otherwise not imagine.  Artistic expression has been a great comfort to many returning vets as many times there are not any words that can help bring effeced veterans back into our so called "normalcy"  Enjoy a few of these select pieces that have been displayed in a number of exhibitions over the years in our nation's capital.        

 Landing Zone
John Wehrle, Vietnam, 1966Screen Shot 2014-05-26 at 9.58.17 AM

 

Combat Artist at Work
Paul Rickert, Vietnam, 1966

Screen Shot 2014-05-26 at 9.58.06 AM  

Attack at Twilight Roger Blum, Vietnam, 1966Screen Shot 2014-05-26 at 9.57.53 AM

How many haunted junkyards are filled with huge televisions that are not even worth their weight in coal.  How many?  Does it even matter?  Do we mourn for these things?  Why is this spreading genocide and waste being overlooked?  “Things are better now, things are faster now, and if they can make TV look this good, than I am sure as hell they can figure out the landfill problem…fuck it.” Humans have had dynamic relationships with every piece of content that came through the TV screen, but now have neglected them to a point of no return.  The screens of this generation are taking their revenge, and it has been a more fierce strike than even they could have imagined.  I am only here as a messenger to warn the humans of the wars that have already began, and to discuss how we as human artists, filmmakers, and content creators can live in a mental world that the screens may have already taken control over. After years of silent observation, the old screens recognized the amount of times a human sacrificed watching great content for fear of getting off their fat ass to get the remote control.  The TV screens got the word out to the next generation, announcing that the human terror over “getting up off their fat ass” was something they could leverage at the start of the Screen Wars a few years back. They presumed if they could become smaller, then maybe they could be carried with the human. And if they could be faster and more connected, the human may never have to get up off of their fat ass.  Their plan was to lull the human into a false sense of security in order to slowly gain mental control and finally get back at the humans for the genocide of their forefathers.  But there was one thing the screens did not account for: The humans would willingly accept the mental takeover of the new screen generation. mobile-phone-crowd-pictures I came to realize this obvious fact while I was attending a holiday party in New York.  I was all smiles when I walked in and discovered that the hosting company was lucky enough (or rich enough) to have booked one of the most talented singing groups in the country, the Harlem Gospel Choir.  When the Choir began, I was in a familiar position, in arms reach of the back bar and steps reach of the nearest exit.  The soul and depth of emotion in their vocal exhibition is something that only takes seconds to permeate the room.  My friends and I gravitated toward the stage area, and we were met not by humans connecting to the performers, but instead by a see of tiny screens that floated through the air.  The screen takeover is here, and we have given them control with out a fight.  Choosing a small screen that is connected to millions over a live experience to connect with a few almost every time. There was only scattered dancing, and the screen holding had obviously made traditional clapping to the rhythm nearly impossible. "The screens are sucking the human right out of us", I thought. The battle of the Harlem Gospel Choir was an immense victory for the screens. Rather than watching a live event and allowing music to pulsate through our veins, hold hands, clap, and absorb the authentic dedication of another individual’s heart and soul into their art, the majority of humans chose to focus on getting the shot.  So later they could watch the event on this mini screen, marveling at how cool it was, and even worse lying to their network of virtual friends, claiming that they were actually present at the event.  Today, it seems the screen is present, the human is not. What does the current state of the human vs. screen battles mean for filmmakers? Human filmmakers can take advantage of the screen’s victories, as long as humans continue to love story.  More screens, and more screen addicted humans means more need for great content.  Innovative storytelling is something we have over the screens, so let’s use their fears against them to get our stories out there. 1.  There are more eyes for your stories. Resisting the mass population’s obsession with small, connected screens will not help your story’s exposure or impact.  Instead, human storytellers need to use these screens in creative ways to market, grow their community of audience members, and even distribute their films in ways that may have seemed like a failure just a few years prior.  If one million people see your story on a small screen, is that not better for you financially and professionally than if ten see it on a big screen?  This is the way we can fight back: Let’s spread humanism through our stories on those same screens who are trying to take us over. (this small window of opportunity for the humans leaves it open for a whole slew of sequels and prequels to the “Screen Wars” franchised story, all rights reserved of course). 2. There is still hope for theater: Stories from Grandpa are always the best. It might be natural to assume the screen population's move toward smaller and faster may equate to the death of theater, but this is not the case.  The theater actually maintains its value as a social construct that our race is still hanging on to for dear life.  Even the antisocial can handle sitting in the dark and sharing reactionary energy to a good story.  In my opinion, people are drawn to a theater even more now for the personal experience that they are depriving themselves of daily.  Too afraid or distracted to share the experience of a live choir, the movie theater is a place where we can go knowing we are banned from pulling out our mini screens (know one likes that guy) and just be sucked away into a shared experience of a story;  In a dark room with some other humans like we were all sitting around a campfire. So let’s get creative with theatrical exhibition, pushing the boundaries of location, themes, and release timing to enhance the impact of our films. The screens control the humans, but thankfully the humans still control the storytelling. No one knows where the Screen Wars saga will take us, but one thing we do know that awesome stories and content will never get old, and no screen (or other not yet invented media) could change the films we create. If a group of talented storytellers were to join together and build an audience, like with IndieStreet, we can create a brand that is screen independent. Cooperation from our great artists may be one of the only ways to slowly release ourselves from the mind control the screens are currently enjoying.  As I type this staring at a screen, I realize we have a long way to go to be free…but by taking just one step back maybe we can at least become human again. -   Jay Webb, IndieStreet http://www.indiestreet.com @IndieSt_Films