INDIESTREET

As a fan of enjoying a good craft beer with an even (hopefully) better film, I'm always excited to stumble across innovative ways beer and movies converge. Imagine my delight when I discovered the genius of Beer Mat Movies. The twitter page is a witty collection of micro-film reviews written on a single beer mat (AKA beer coaster) for those "on the go". If it don't fit, it don't fly. From recent reviews of mainstream fare like "X-Men: Apocalypse" to kid friendly films like "Zootropolis" and indie horrors such as "The Witch", the extremely concise beer-drinking, film-loving person behind the tweets offers a hilarious new way of analyzing and criticizing film all the while making use of what's under your beer. Keepin' it simple has earned them over 600 followers + counting! As they say, "If you can't sum up your opinion of a film on a beer mat, you're being pretentious." Grab a cold one and check out Beer Mat Movies' twitter to read up on some of their pretty on point, witty reviews.

The Sundance Film Festival returns once again to take over Park City, Utah until February 1st. Last year Sundance world premieres included Boyhood, Whiplash, and The Babadook, and this year looks just as promising. Noah Baumbach reunites with Greta Gerwig for Mistress America, Eli Roth and Keanu Reeves offer scares with Knock Knock, Jason Segel brings David Foster Wallace back to life in The End of the Tour, and Joe Swanberg leads an all-star cast on an adventure in Digging for Fire. See the top picks here

A STYLISTIC MASH-UP OF ARCHIVAL FOOTAGE, INTERVIEWS, AND ANIMATED SEQUENCES, the Kurt Cobain documentary, Montage of Heck, premiered at Sundance '15 to a stunned audience. Anyone could have crafted a documentary about a band. Director Brett Morgen's experimental, road-less-traveled approach does something that's much deeper: letting you feel as if you've pored through someone's scrapbook. You get the sense that Kurt would have liked this. As for his fans, be prepared to meet the man you admire, warts and all. Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/mo

The word "smart car" now has an entirely new meaning thanks to a conceptual vision from the global design and innovation firm, IDEO. Responding to the future of autonomous driving, on demand delivery services, and the future of the workspace is in the works. Chief designer, Ricardo Figueiroa explains "As business models, technical innovations and user needs evolve, we expect to continue to see many exciting developments in the transportation and mobility domain." In the works, a self-driving car that delivers your packages and an office space that transports you to your next meeting across town without any work downtime. Click here for more.

In 1954, a 150 ft lizard splashed onto Japan’s movie screens, and ants the size of trucks crawled onto American ones. The success of Godzilla and Them! spurred Hollywood and Tokyo filmmakers to rush more supersized mutants in front of audiences, often with ridiculous results. Relive a handful of these cinematic "gems" including Monster From The Ocean Floor (1954) & Attack Of The Crab Monsters (1957) HERE.

Shawn Kingsley and Holly Migliaccio, the founders and co-owners of Rook Coffee,childhood friends and business partners, both left corporate jobs to open and operate the first Rook Coffee bar inside of a 300-square-foot bungalow that sits just off Monmouth Road in Ocean Township, New Jersey. Five years later, that gamble has spawned six coffee bars, a roastery and distribution center, a bottled cold brew business and an online retail business. Read More

For this commercial for Britvic's Robinsons Squash'd, Gravity director Alfonso Cuaron and Framestore got a chance to shoot in zero gravity for real. Filming took place on a specially modified plane known as the 'vomit comet', which conducts parabolic flights that give its passengers 15 seconds of weightlessness. A crew of eight were tasked with filming a water balloon containing the drink being burst with a pin, resulting in the water droplets floating through the air, ready to be haphazardly sucked up by two passengers through a straw.

Nowadays, in the second Golden Age of TV and the burgeoning first heyday of the podcast, writers run the show. All literary critics love words, but it sometimes seems that visual storytelling, both in the making and the appreciation, has become a bit neglected. Not so, however, in the realm of the graphic novel (or memoir, or nonfiction treatise — we really need a different term for this genre). Putting together this (non-definitive) list of 10 standout graphic novels from 2014 was an exercise in the power of the image, whether the pages in question come in austere black-and-white or a full spectrum of color... Read More