INDIESTREET

 

One mind’s manifestations, challenged by new and total blindness, are the main focus of Eskil Vogt’s highly inspired debut drama “Blind”.  A somewhat self-reflexive portrait of one woman’s creative struggle with recent loss of vision, the film explores the consequences of both sightlessness and loneliness.  With the shutting down of one sense, every other sense becomes heightened.  Taking this direction, “Blind” allows the audience an amplified and surreal viewing experience completely withdrawn into fantasy.

 

The film follows newly blind Ingrid, played by standout Ellen Dorrit Petersen, as she copes with the darkness by embracing her vivid imagination. We learn early on that Ingrid’s blindness came without much warning.  She now spends her days constantly awaiting the return of her elusive architect husband, Morten (Henrik Rafaelsen).  During his absence, and sometimes even in his presence, she imagines the world he must surely be inhabiting, or craving to inhabit.  Is he present in the room, secretly watching her, or is he off seeking physical satisfaction from other women?  These doubts are what drive the entire film and start to create the nuanced narratives and characters within her mind.  Ingrid's narration introduces us to two peripheral characters: a single mother and a porn addicted loner.  These characters, complete with backstories, effortlessly blend into both her imagined world and reality with Morten.  It’s not until the absurdity of her creations start to unravel into more serious territory that we see the true reality behind her paranoia.

 

 

 

Bathed in a whitened glow, the ethereal Petersen creates an almost animalistic Ingrid.  Hungry for knowledge of the space around her, we become part of her desperation and playful demeanor.  As Ingrid states at the beginning: “They say that my ability to visualize will fade away.  That the optic lens wither without new impressions ... but I can maintain it”.  And maintain it she does.  Like one of the film's standout scenes, we stand with Ingrid, pressed against the surface of her apartment window, craving to see and be seen.  Currently available on DVD and UK/Ireland VOD platforms, Vogt has created a debut film that leaves behind a haunting, lingering memory of derailed reality long after watching.

 

Reviewed By: Indie Street's  Sarah Rice 

Just released this week on Vimeo, A Song Still Inside is a character driven drama that draws you in while quietly provoking suspense. The film is a gutsy emotional dissection of love submerged in our changing gender roles. It is wonderfully shot and acted...much congrats from IndieStreet to this successful directorial debut film from Gregory Collins. (starring Rodrigo Lopresti, Susan Highsmith, and Jayce Bartok) Purchase the film on Vimeo on Demand by clicking here:

Polish artist Pawel Kuczynski is one of our favorite satirical illustrators in the world. He offers a truly unique style and tackles many of the world's complex issues with his unique visions. From light hearted social media pieces to heavier human rights, he is an artist who makes his audience really think hard about the world and society they live in. These our are favorites to date, but you can check out his Facebook page here for more works from his ten years of creating illustrations.  

satire_1

satire_brushes satire_shit_talk

satire_beer

satire_pigs

 satire_apple

satire_animals

On IndieStreet we love innovative environmental concepts, and we love cold beer! A Danish firm has combined these two loves with their underground beer fridge that can be sunk into the garden or terrace. It takes advantage of the cooler underground conditions to keep your beers chilled. How do you say street creds in Danish? You can learn more about the company and buy the eCool here. It's currently priced at $349.00. As they say at eCool: Lets "Save the world - one earth-cooled beer at a time"  

Pages